Tuesday, April 30, 2013

A good image: worth a thousand words

As you know, I try to scan every collage - even the small collage tags - into the archive. They are scanned at a super-high resolution - usually 800 dpi and above. Some say that's overkill, but the resulting prints are beautiful, and true to the originals. Well, as true as they can be, given that they're flat - not layered.

However, sometimes, a deadline looms, and there's not time to have pieces scanned. This wasn't a problem until recently, when I began making collages larger than the 9"x12" size my scanner accommodates.

Of course, I tell myself it will never happen again, then, gulp, it does. Usually, it takes a few days to get an image scanned. I hope to build that into my deadlines in the future.

You might ask, how about a photograph? Well, that works fine for some art, but in my experience, photographs don't capture the nuances of the antique engravings that are often part of my work.

Below are examples of three collages that were scanned recently, and the images of them that were posted before the scans. The collages were framed at this point, so they had to be removed from the frames. Happily, my framer put them back together at no additional charge, one benefit of establishing a strong, working relationship with her.

The Grand Tour: Bird's Eye view - scanned
In the photo, the entire image is washed out, especially the map.
It's missing small, last-minute changes, because I didn't have my camera
at the studio. I now keep it there, because even a so-so photo
is better than not having any image of a finished piece.

The Grand Tour: Riding the Waves - scanned

Note how much more detailed the clothing is in the scanned image. As in the previous
piece, the photo's minus work done after it was shot. The perspective's off, too,
which is kind of cool but doesn't reflect reality. And to think that I was so desperate
to post the image, that I did. Mea culpa.

The Grand Tour: Wild Things - scanned
You know what I am going to say, the difference between
the two is that obvious!